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Product Review - **DJI Phantom 2 w/ H3-2D Gimbal

Discussion in 'Member Drone Product Reviews' started by Motopreserve, May 3, 2014.

  1. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 3, 2014 #1
    Review: DJI Phantom 2 with Zenmuse H3-2D Gimbal

    For the past several years, if you have been looking for a self-contained, ready to fly (RTF) quad, chances are you’ve stumbled on the DJI Phantom line of multi-rotor helicopters. Due to an active marketing campaign the Phantom line has become ubiquitous throughout the RC industry and, although the Phantom has its competitors, there seem to be more Phantoms out there flying than any other single offering. If you’re interested in getting started in aerial video, chances are you’ve at least considered one of the Phantoms… admit it, you know you have. When I first got obsessed with multi-rotors, the appeal of a pre-built system was tempting but the tinkerer in me overrode the lure of simplicity. After a ton of research I eventually chose to purchase and assemble the components myself but with that choice came a host of challenges including mining the Internet for information, sourcing parts and a mountainous learning curve. Having chosen the path of utmost resistance, I was well into puttering with my Multiwii code, modified frames and learning to tweak gimbal software when MultiRotorForums.com came knocking.

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    As fate would have it, Bart from MultiRotorForums.com shipped a package to my door for review. Out of the box popped a DJI Phantom 2, complete with Zenmuse H3-2D gimbal, brand-spanking new and ready for some aerial video. Although you may have read reviews of the Phantom in the past, hopefully this review can provide a unique perspective – that of moving from scratch-built quads to Ready-To-Fly (RTF), instead of the more common other way around. Despite my leanings toward the DIY aesthetic, I relished the idea of just unpacking this quad, charging up some batteries and launching it into the clear blue sky.

    [​IMG]


    Packaging and Unboxing:

    Everyone has seen unboxing videos, and I think we all know that packaging doesn’t make the product. Despite knowing this, when a product arrives in a spiffy box it just seems to inspire confidence. Like Apple before them, DJI pulled out all the stops, wrapping this quad like a thing of beauty. The Phantom 2 comes complete with everything you need to fly except 4 AA batteries for the transmitter (Tx). Although my inner-child wanted to tear into this box like a 5-year old banshee on Christmas morning, the complexities of a multi-rotor (yes, even this RTF one) had me checking myself. Fearing I’d break something before the review even got started, responsibility kicked in and the unboxing was more “for Pete’s sake, don’t drop anything!” Removing it from the box you will find the quad almost fully assembled, requiring only the flight battery to be charged, AA batteries installed in the Tx, and the props spun onto the motors. This is the type of simplicity that has appealed to countless consumers and this approach challenged my preconceived notions and skepticism about the quality possible with a prefab multi-rotor helicopter.

    [​IMG]

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    Contents:

    The Phantom 2 kit includes; the quadcopter (which is self-contained in a bright, white shell), flight battery, transmitter, 8 props (4 spares), a few tools, hardware and some literature. This package is meant to get you up in the air quickly where you can then work to hone your piloting skills. Except for a single proprietary “Can-bus” port for gimbal power and data, the body of the Phantom 2 hides all the ‘brains behind the operation,’ with everything tucked neatly inside.

    First impression after handling the Tx for a bit was that it was rather flimsy. The radio lacks the physical size and weight of the more popular name brands, and with only 2 switches and a single potentiometer lever on the back (for gimbal pitch adjustment), it’s clearly meant for use with this specific craft. Enthusiasts who find the radio limiting, or not up to par with their tastes, also have the option to bind easily with a Futaba radio.

    Moving on I singled out the flight battery and charger only to discover that this is a very different type of Lipo. The 5200mah battery is sheathed in a plastic frame with LED indicator lights facing the rear of the quad. These lights serve double duty as a handy “fuel gauge,” letting you know how much charge remains during flight, as well as a charge-status indicator back at home base. The kit includes a special charger which hooks up to the battery in only one way, eliminating the fear of accidentally switching polarity and causing trouble. Rational or not, there is something less threatening about this battery and I found myself not at all worried it might burst into flames.

    One of the few things necessary to “assemble” the quad is placing the props on the motors. The included props are specific to the DJI line of motors, with an internal self-tightening nut inside the hub – making the install a breeze. One drawback to this system is that there is a “hubcap” on the top of the hub, which prevents balancing the props. A quick turn to YouTube and I found a makeshift way to balance using a DuBro balancer and some silicone tubing. The package also includes some hardware and a few tools. Despite laying out all of my assembly tools prior to opening the box, it seems DJI had thought of everything, and I never touched my own gear to get this thing flight-ready. Some basic paperwork is included in the box (rare nowadays), but you’re encouraged to visit the web site to get full the scoop on the craft.

    The last thing I’ll say about the contents; I would have liked to see the transmitter come with a rechargeable battery. Although disposable AA batteries are cheap, it would be nice (and responsible) to balance the overall package by including a rechargeable battery pack for the transmitter. For me, the appeal of the advanced-feature flight battery was offset a bit by this omission.

    The following is a quick (VERY QUICK AND PAINLESS!) look at the unboxing and contents.




    Software:

    I started charging the Lipo and scooted over to the DJI website to get familiar with the Phantom 2 and to see what info I could gather before diving into my first flight. Much like the packaging, the website is slick and polished, reminding us once again that the folks at DJI have not skimped on their presence. After reading through the marketing splash page, I eventually found my way to the support section. Here the most recent firmware and software can be downloaded as well as manuals and quick-start guides.

    The first thing you need to do is download software to connect with each component of the package. Although the main Phantom software (GUI) has limited input to each of the components, to fully adjust parameters you need to download 3 different interfaces. The internal Naza V2 flight controller (FC), Tx and the H3-2D gimbal all have their own software. This seemed more complicated than necessary, especially for an RTF quad with simplicity at its core. Inexplicably, despite having Mac versions for both the FC and Tx software, the gimbal GUI is not yet Apple friendly. But let’s dive in; it’s time to start downloading…

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    Battery fully charged (love those indicator lights!) and the Assistant Software GUI downloaded, I followed the instructions and connected the Phantom 2 to my computer and was immediately prompted to update the GUI software. I did so, and afterward I was prompted to download and install newer firmware for the Naza FC. Once you’re all set with the various updates, onscreen lies the full potential of this multi-rotor, with one interesting caveat. The default firmware setting that the Phantom 2 ships with has a limited number of functions. These default settings are a simpler, more basic beginner mode. But it only takes the click of a mouse to access the full features, which are tucked away for when you are ready to utilize them. I found this to be a nice touch, erring on the side of caution and safety for those that are just getting started in the hobby. The software install is fairly painless, although at this point I only had a sketchy Windows netbook to download the gimbal software. The reputation of the Zenmuse series is strong, so I hoped it would be unnecessary for my initial flights...

    [​IMG]


    TO BE CONTINUED…
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2014
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  2. Bartman

    Bartman Welcome to MultiRotorForums.com!!

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    Posted by Bartman, May 3, 2014 #2
    I loved that video!
     
  3. DucktileMedia

    DucktileMedia Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by DucktileMedia, May 3, 2014 #3
    I think that was the first time I've ever seen a timelapse of un boxing where someone was watching an Un boxing video. There was a quick clip of un boxing on your screen,right?
     
  4. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 3, 2014 #4
    That would make me "RC" Escher :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2014
  5. econfly

    econfly Member

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    Posted by econfly, May 3, 2014 #5
    Great read and neat video! I'm interested in your flight time with the H3-2D and GoPro on it. Bart sent me the Phantom 1, and with the stock battery and just the GoPro (no gimbal) it provides about 7-8 minutes of flight time, at most.

    One thing about these Phantoms that can go unnoticed is just how nice they are for training. I have been taking the Phantom 1 out this past week or so just to work on my manual flying. Like (I expect) many who came to the multirotor world in the past few years I tend to lean hard on the flight controller taking care of attitude control, and rarely fly in manual mode. But I want to have that ability if I ever need it. An affordable little quad like the Phantom -- that has both manual mode and the ability to switch into Atti or GPS if needed to get things back under control when practicing -- is a great thing to have.
     
  6. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 3, 2014 #6
    Thanks so much Econfly. I figured everyone had seen enough unboxing videos of the Phantom already :)

    I have been very impressed with the straight flying (manual, as well as the other modes) of the Phantom2. It's a great trainer quad, and perfect for pushing your piloting skills.

    Unfortunately, I've had to spend a fair amount of time wrestling with calibration (software and compass) and the gimbal - so I can't give a fair as assessment of the flight times yet.

    Today for the first time I was able to get out and fly it with the gimbal pointing somewhere other than straight down. The fact that it was between rain storms meant I couldn't recharge. So it was a fairly short flight.

    The gimbal seems to perform really well, and my initial positive impressions were not unfounded. Ill have more more to report soon.
     
  7. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 5, 2014 #7
    DJI Phantom 2 w/H3-2D gimbal: PART 2

    Review: DJI Phantom 2 with Zenmuse H3-2D Gimbal: PART 2

    The Phantom 2 let loose…

    I had hoped to be able to do some simple software updates and then get this quad outside for the initial test flights. But it wasn’t that easy. After a series of attempted bench calibrations, scouring the forums for info, then reattempting the calibrations, I was finally updated and ready to head out to the driveway to let the Phantom 2 loose. The experiences thus far had left me leery to do the initial liftoff with my GoPro attached, so I decided to leave the gimbal inside for these first tests.

    With the Phantom 2 level on the driveway, I powered up and allowed it to acclimate. Now it was time for the compass calibration, a series of 360-degree moves, which you are prompted through by the changing LED color patterns. Unfortunately this was not as simple as I had hoped. I attempted to get the compass calibrated several times with no success (see video). Frequent checks of the manual (kept on my phone for quick reference) assured me that I was doing the procedure correctly. The LED flashing its failure sign began to torment and mock me. Eventually I headed back inside to the computer and the Assistant Software. Some more online research revealed that I needed to once again ignore what the Assistant Software was telling me, and proceed to the more thorough bench calibration. Once done, back outside…



    Trudged back out to the driveway. Set it down. Let it acclimate. Trigger the compass calibration. Look like a goofball while spinning the quad in odd gyrations… Bingo! The LEDs beneath the arms now glowed with love and acceptance, and my relief was palpable. I was redeemed! Once calibrated, I was impressed by the Phantom 2, which locked in on GPS satellites much quicker than any of my other multi-rotors. I have always had a hard time obtaining GPS lock in this driveway (who knows what is interfering with the GPS here – but I suspect it’s related to the ornery neighbor…). But the Phantom 2 reached out and grabbed the satellites by the horns, and we were ready to go.

    The initial liftoff was uneventful, except for a momentary pitch to the rear, which then leveled immediately after getting a few inches off the ground. That has since been a trend with my Phantom 2 take-offs, and I’m still not sure if it’s the quad or me. Goosing the throttle, and getting away from the ground effect swiftly seems to help overcome this issue. I conservatively flew the quad around the driveway, getting to know the flight characteristics and the different flight modes. Atti mode was the most fun, allowing me to push the Phantom 2 a little harder on fast-forward movement, but then steadying itself quickly when the pitch stick self-centered.

    The GPS Mode was briefly tested, which locks the controls a bit much for my taste, but could be beneficial to a pilot looking to retain a steady hover. I flew the Phantom 2 for a while, eventually wearing out my welcome in the driveway. After about ten minutes of flight, some mellow and some more spirited, I decided to call it a day. I was also pleased to see the battery still had plenty of life left in it. Perhaps the claims of 20+ minute flight times are true? Regardless of what the total flight times will be, this multi-rotor is fun to fly, plain and simple.

    Of note: the default, more beginner Naza M software mode doesn’t allow the choice of Manual Mode. That requires opening up the fuller controller software in the Assistant. For now, the lack of Manual Mode was fine – waiting for a more open flying area being a better place to let this thing loose, and also test the Zenmuse H3-2D…

    Field Flying: the real deal…

    It was time to head to better flight zone, and after easily tucking the Phantom 2 onto my passenger seat, I was off. The field I fly at most-often is a big open area with only a couple soccer goals and some benches for obstacles. This makes for a good testing site, especially during Vermont winters when all the soccer players are off doing something far warmer than flying a quad in the frozen tundra. Although I had done the compass calibrations back at home, and despite only being a mile away, I figured it safest to recalibrate. This time the calibration took immediately, quelling my fears that if unsuccessful I’d have to pack it in before getting some real flying in.

    [​IMG]

    While in the driveway, I hadn’t hooked up the gimbal, but looked forward to seeing what the Zenmuse H3-2D could do when unleashed at the flying field. I had repeatedly done the pitch control bench calibration, often getting good results for a few moments immediately following the procedure. But for some reason, here at the field, the Zenmuse decided that filming straight down at the ground was the best vantage point. I messed with the pitch lever (X1) on the back of the radio to no avail. While it just looked like dead grass to me, maybe the Phantom 2 knew something I didn’t? Now was the time for more flying and less worrying. I’d deal with the Zenmuse later…

    Arm the motors, and away we go.

    I zipped and zagged around the field in Atti mode, keeping good height to avoid the obstacles, but also to see how well the altitude hold worked. So far, so good. The agility of a quad this size (350mm motor to motor diagonally) makes for some really fun flying, and I was again comfortable and within moments of take-off feeling loose with the controls . After spending about ½ the battery, I decided I needed to test out the GPS mode, and flipped the switch to find it grab lock, and stay fairly close to its position without correction from the sticks. Very encouraging. In the GUI setup, I had chosen to have the Fail Safe and Return to Home (RTH) function lift the Phantom to a predetermined height, steady itself, and then return to the launch location and land. For me, no matter what flight controller I’m using, trying RTH for the first time is always a little unnerving. Despite a safe distance from any living thing, in the back of my mind loomed stories about Naza flyaway’s, and videos of Phantoms drifting off into the sunset. But this review needs to be thorough, and that requires a bit of nerve. So with the Phantom approximately 100 yards away, I flipped the switch to engage RTH. I could barely see the quad steady its position, hold the altitude for a moment, and then rise slowly. After hitting its altitude mark, it held there for some time, and then began to slowly come back my way. It arrived above me, stopped, and started its decent for landing, just as it should.

    [​IMG]

    Checked the battery and it had plenty of juice left – so back airborne for more spirited Atti Mode flying (quickly becoming my favorite) and some tests of the GPS Flight Mode. It was not taking long for me to trust the Phantom. With all flight controllers, my personal preference is to avoid flying in GPS Mode, so it was no surprise that I also found the Phantom/Naza M to be restricted while flying this way. It’s not the fault of this particular controller, I just prefer being afforded more control over the pitch and roll than typical GPS Flight Mode allows. That being said: the GPS Mode on this quad is pretty solid – and on calm days could easily aid in the capture of steady video footage. Vermont winter winds were still active, and the GPS seemed to hold its position fairly well, only allowing slight drift, and then recalculating its way back to the original position. After a brief time, I was comfortable enough to predict the Phantom’s flight characteristics, and pushed the quad even further and faster. A few laps around the field in Manual Mode proved stress-free, and I was again impressed with the tight feel of the quad. Clearly, this thing can rip it up if it wants to.

    One thing that concerned me at the end of the flight was despite the battery indicator still showing 2 bars of power left, the quad began to descend rapidly. Losing power, I quickly did a controlled landing. No problem, as I was only about 10 feet up, and planning to land anyway. But based on the indicator, I would have assumed I had at least a little more flight time left. Had I been been higher in the air, it seems that gravity could have had its way with the craft.

    Overall, good times all around. The flights were steady and quick, fun and never overwhelming. I was beginning to really like this little multi-rotor…

    Stay tuned for part 3: Gimbal and final thoughts...
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2014
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  8. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 7, 2014 #8
    DJI Phantom 2 w/ H3-2D Review: Part 3

    DJI Phantom 2 Review: PART 3
    Zenmuse H3-2D Gimbal:


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    Like all of the DJI Zenmuse products, the H3-2D gimbal is specifically designed for just one camera, the GoPro Hero 3(+). It is a self-contained unit, revealing none of the power and control that lies beneath. The gimbal consists of a mounting mechanism for attaching it to the underneath of the quad (complete with spare and alternate dampeners), and the main unit that houses the 2 motors and the electronics. Weighing in at 230g without camera, the H3-2D is fairly light compared to other gimbals, but does add a decent amount of weight to an already light quad. The plate that holds the camera has a protruding digital port connector, which transmits video data for downlink, as well as the power required to run the GoPro. While some may appreciate the flight battery powering the camera, I would rather have seen an option to turn this feature off. In my experience, the internal GoPro battery provides enough power for several typical video flights, and I personally would prefer to retain the Phantom battery voltage for longer flight times.

    [​IMG]

    The camera is installed by pushing it against the digital port, which is part of the mounting plate. Because the port is an integral part of the plate, it eliminates the need for adjusting Center of Gravity (CoG). This feature alone sets the Zenmuse family of gimbals apart from the competition. Once the camera is pushed against the digital port, it feels incredibly secure. So secure in fact, you could be tempted to fly with just that connection (not advised). An additional bar is provided that straps over the face of the GoPro, and screws into the Zenmuse mount plate. This provides added security, alleviating all fears that the camera might come loose while in flight. But that security comes at a cost. Once the bar is installed, removing the GoPro becomes a bit of a chore. Erring on the side of caution with a camera this expensive is probably a good thing, and I was glad to know it was ‘in safe hands.’ There is always the option to use a Velcro strap instead of the aluminum bar.

    As mentioned earlier, the mounting style of this gimbal doesn’t allow for the addition of a protective camera case. It would be nice to be able to slip a lens cover/case over the camera, to ensure that a direct hit would not damage the lens. I did note that the gimbal sits slightly back from the front plane of the landing gear, which seems like it would protect the camera in the event of a crash. The position of the gimbal under the frame is bitter sweet. The recessed mounting position should protect the camera, but it also makes it awkward for removing and replacing the microSD card. It took a little wrestling with the angles to get the card installed and ready for recording. It doesn’t help that the microSD card used for the GoPro 3(+) is cartoonish small. The other thing noted about the gimbal position is that is sits very low, and while it did not concern me on the bench, I quickly found the camera dangling in the grass when at the field.

    Despite earlier trouble getting the transmitter lever to talk to the H3-2D pitch control, I finally got it set after repeatedly calibrating the X1 lever in the Assistant Software. The failed calibration had resulted in the gimbal moving to an unpredictable location, regardless of where I moved the lever. I had hoped moving the lever more slowly would produce more predictable results, but the speed at which it was moved seemed to have no positive effect on its overall motion. At the first field flight test, it had only operated pointing straight down, which was not the best position for it to get “stuck” in.

    Eventually though, it just worked. I wish I could report figuring out what fixed it, but in the end, a random number of identical calibrations finally got it to take hold. Although I wanted to make sure I put the included transmitter through its paces for the purposes of this review, this issue has made me even more eager to bind a Futaba radio with the Phantom 2, to see whether the problem is only related to the X1 control potentiometer.

    Operating properly now, I would be able to see what this thing could do. The reputation of the Zenmuse series is well known. I looked forward to some carefree, smooth video. I have tuned gimbals in the past, and setting PIDs can be both daunting and frustrating. The time spent tuning is time taken away from flying and filming, so the promise of good results without the mess, was very appealing. For the first time in days, there was a break in the weather, and I headed out to a lake cottage to test out the Zenmuse H3-2D. The day was windy, which promised to be perfect for testing the performance of the gimbal. I lifted off and quickly tested the functionality of the newly “fixed” X1 lever. Although it seemed to work, at first it was quite ‘jerky’ in its movement. Then it settled, and the movement became smoother and predictable. When looking back at the footage (see video), I did notice transitions from one pitch angle to the next to be somewhat stepped, but not consistently. This issue has been well documented across the web, so I will see if there are adjustments to mellow the movements.

    Once the Phantom was airborne, and the position of the camera angle set, the performance of this little gimbal was amazing. Steady shots were effortless, even as the quad was tossed around by the wind. For a turnkey system requiring no tuning whatsoever, this gimbal is a breath of fresh air. While I noticed a bit of distortion in the video from some sudden yaw moves, it was the wind that caused it (it couldn't possibly be my piloting!), I’m convinced a calmer day would have produced jello-free, gorgeous results. I look forward to getting some more airtime with the Zenmuse H3-2D, and have been converted to someone who truly appreciates the smooth results from a “care-free” gimbal.



    Conclusions:

    I had looked forward to reviewing an RTF quad, mainly because it had been a choice that I dismissed when first getting into the hobby. I have no frame of reference to compare the Phantom 2, although I am aware of other RTF offerings available on the market today (Blade, Walkera). But after flying the Phantom 2, I can honestly say that it may have a place in the hanger of even the most seasoned veteran. The ease of use and the simplicity of tossing the Phantom 2 into the car, heading to the field for a day of fun flying, is something that appeals to me. While I would not trade-in my other multi-rotors, the lack of frustrations and stress that can accompany the use of more expensive, complicated craft, is something that I can appreciate.

    While the sticker price is not exactly cheap, and probably not within the budget of the ‘everyman,’ it certainly has a place for consideration as either a starter quad, or simply as a fun flying machine capable of good video, with very little effort.

    I will be continuing to fly the Phantom 2 to see if there are things I could have improved upon for these initial tests. If you have any specific questions, please feel free to post here…
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 22, 2014
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  9. SoCal Blur

    SoCal Blur Member

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    Posted by SoCal Blur, May 7, 2014 #9
    Nicely done, Scott.
     
  10. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 7, 2014 #10
    Thanks SoCal! This review was fun to do, and definitely opened my eyes to the RTF area of the industry, which I had previously [unfairly] discounted. I'm not trading in my DIY birds - but it's nice to see what can be had for much less stress and headache :)
     
    2 people like this.
  11. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, Jan 29, 2015 #11
    It's been quite a while since I last updated this review. Although reviews are typically focused on initial impressions, I thought it might be helpful to do a follow-up, updating my thoughts on the Phantom 2.

    The recent news has been awash with harrowing tales about irresponsible Phantom owners, and as of this posting, DJI has announced a 'mandatory' firmware update that will limit certain flight zones for US customers. While this may prove helpful and safer for folks new to the technology, it raises the question, is the Phantom 2 a toy, or a tool?

    My review centered around the fact that I was a multirotor owner/pilot who had never owned a pre-built, RTF MR. I was skeptical about the performance I would get out of a craft that was designed for the masses, and not just for my own specific needs. But DJI, and the performance of the Phantom 2 impressed me, and it continues to surprise me how well it fits into the arsenal of craft that I employ for aerial video and practicing my piloting skills.

    Unlike my other rigs, the Phantom is limited to the GoPro 3. But that has not stopped me from relying on it when I want a small, simple rig to toss in the truck and head to a location on a whim. The ease of use, along with the steady flight characteristics (provided by the Naza M V2 flight controller) have made this a craft that I still turn to when I want a less stressful, easy day of filming. There is also something to be said for the lower cost of this multirotor, as compared to all my other craft. Although the base price may be steep for some, comparatively, if you own larger expensive multirotors it is a bargain for the performance you can achieve. While I would never want to lose the Phantom 2 in a crash, gone are the worries about such expensive gear, and the fear that a large investment could be lost by a single error.

    In keeping with my less stressful experience with the Phantom 2 is my willingness to allow others to fly it. Due to the steady, simple nature of the handling, I do not shy away from allowing others to "take it for a spin." Friends from my flight club, who only fly RC planes, have benefited from my lack of paranoia with this MR. There is simply no way that I would allow someone to take control of one of my more expensive craft. But with the Phantom 2, I have allowed them to get a taste of this new (to them) technology. The smiles on their faces have been well worth it. I have now extended this opportunity to my nephew, who expressed interest in learning to fly - but who I would never try to teach on my 900mm hex. With the Phantom 2, slow and steady, my nephew will now be able to learn the responsible, correct way to fly.

    When it comes to an opportunity like this, to share something I enjoy so much with my friends and nephew, I would have a hard time finding a better choice than the Phantom 2.
     
  12. BretRhines

    BretRhines New Member

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    Posted by BretRhines, May 17, 2015 #12
    DJI never lets me down. The Phantom 2+ has been my go to drone and I've captured some pretty great footage with it. Not as good as the what I've shot on a friend's Inspire but for the price you can't beat it. Stoked to receive the Phantom 3 too.
     
  13. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, May 17, 2015 #13
    If you're in the market for a great backpack/transport for the Phantom series - check out the review for the ThinkTank bag. Different take on a case. More photo bag than pelican case.
     
  14. Posted by DJI Stores Inc, Jul 3, 2015 #14
    Was the video sped up or are you just that good?
     
  15. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, Jul 3, 2015 #15
    Both :)
     
  16. Posted by DJI Stores Inc, Jul 3, 2015 #16
    I've gotta say, DJI Phantoms may not be the most customizable, but your getting your money's worth.
     
  17. Motopreserve

    Motopreserve Drone Enthusiast

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    Posted by Motopreserve, Jul 3, 2015 #17
    They are definitely a value, at least compared to the current market. It will be interesting to see how the rest of the offerings shape up in the coming year.

    Biggest drawback to the DJI packages at this point seem to be more post-sale related (customer service, repair etc), and less about bang for the buck.
     
    2 people like this.
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