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Generally speaking, 2-axis vs. 3-axis camera mounts

Discussion in 'AP/AV Mounts, Stabilization, etc. Discussion' started by Bartman, Apr 13, 2014.

  1. Bartman

    Bartman Welcome to MultiRotorForums.com!!

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    Posted by Bartman, Apr 13, 2014 #1
    Hi everyone,

    With there being so many choices I thought I'd offer quick explanation on the basics of a 2D vs a 3D camera mount.

    2D and 3D both refer to the number of axis that move and are stabilized. A 2D camera mount will provide roll and tilt movement and stabilization but the whole camera mount will yaw/pan with the helicopter as it moves. If the helicopter yaws to the left the camera will move with it. Ultimately the camera will appear to be stable in tilt and roll but will move with the helicopter in yaw as the helicopter moves.

    A 3D camera mount will have roll and tilt movement/stabilization like a 2D mount but it will also be free to move and provide stabilization in pan as the helicopter yaws. The movement of the helicopter about the axis that runs vertically through the center is called Yaw, the motion of the camera about the same axis is called Pan. Similar but different. Depending on the controller that is stabilizing the camera mount there may be different features for the Pan control such as heading lock (the camera mount tries to maintain a fixed heading as the helicopter varies in Yaw) and POI (Point of Interest, the camera stays pointed at a fixed spot on the ground as the helicopter flies around it).

    The main difference for a new pilot to keep in mind when comparing a 2D vs a 3D camera mount (aka 2-axis or 3-axis mounts) is that a 2D mount is much easier to monitor and control for a single operator than a 3D mount. In most cases a 3D mount will require that a second operator will be available to use a second radio/receiver to "fly" the mount while the helicopter is being flown by the pilot. If you're planning a build for yourself and don't think you'll have a second person available EVERY time you want to fly then you should seriously consider a 2D mount and learn to operate within its limitations. On the other hand if you know for sure you'll have a second person available and that you need the freedom that a 3-axis mount offers then by all means go for the 3 axis option.

    It is usually required for a 3D camera mount that the helicopter have retractable landing gear (unless the gear is attached to and moves with the mount), maybe additional battery packs (depending on the requirements of the mount), a 2nd radio system (transmitter and receiver), and a second operator to "fly" the camera mount. If you understand the difference then the decision can be made more easily. I've been asked about stuff like this and so thought a quick explanation would be helpful.

    FWIW, I've got something that I'll be posting later this week that might be helpful for some but I won't be able to post it until the end of the week as we're finishing up some well deserved time away from home. In the meantime, 2D and 3D gimbals are not entirely interchangeable so know what you're buying before submitting your order.

    Regards,
    Bart
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 13, 2014
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  2. Bartman

    Bartman Welcome to MultiRotorForums.com!!

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    Posted by Bartman, Apr 13, 2014 #2
    in case you were wondering, there is such a thing as a 1D camera mount that will stabilize the camera in roll or tilt only. i had an old XAircraft mount that was tilt-stabilized only. for FPV I'd think the preferred set up would be 1D for tilt only so the camera could roll naturally with the helicopter and compensate in tilt so you're not looking down at the ground as the helicopter is tilted forward.
    Bart
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 13, 2014
  3. chipwich

    chipwich Member

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    Posted by chipwich, Apr 17, 2014 #3
    Very informative post. I hadn't thought of the two in terms of workload, but it does make sense.

    And a 1D for something like the Mobius, 3D printable, simple and light, for micros sounds fantastic.
     
  4. Vampiriste

    Vampiriste Member

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    Posted by Vampiriste, Jun 11, 2014 #4
    Nice and informative, for sure, thanks!

    Could I ask you to focus on my problem, and help me learn some more regarding gimbals.

    I would like to build (from kit) one large DSLR 3D......I have chosen several frames, 3 iFlight brushless gimbal 180T (ore 200T) and now is a problem of controler - haveing in mind that I would like to avoid the most expensive ones if I can. I would like to have an option to run the gimbal on 4S, the same as the UAV to avoid additional batteries - weight
     
  5. Bartman

    Bartman Welcome to MultiRotorForums.com!!

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    Posted by Bartman, Jun 11, 2014 #5
    Vampiriste

    please start a new thread for your question as it is a very broad question and will likely run this thread in a direction is wasn't meant to go in.

    thank you,
    Bart
     
  6. jfro

    jfro Aerial Fun

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    Posted by jfro, Jun 11, 2014 #6
    I fly by myself and I love my 3 axis gopro gimbal. I don't use it to pan/yaw so much as I don't have a retractable landing gear. What I do use it for is to smooth the fast turns and to keep a steady frame when flying. By steady I mean, keeping to a minimum, any back and forth camera movement which the lighter MR's seem to get when there is wind. Hopefully, soon, I'll have a 3rd axis on my other 2 MR's.

    While I agree with your "in most cases" statement, I kind of believe there are many more like me who will add a 3rd axis to keep a steady frame and not necessarily be doing pans that require a 2nd operator. Or should I say, many more that just won't have the luxury of a 2nd operator.

    Anyway, great explanation and thanks again for the educational / informative information.
     
  7. SoCal Blur

    SoCal Blur Member

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    Posted by SoCal Blur, Jun 11, 2014 #7
    Good information, Bart. You may want to mention that you can set up the yaw axis on a 3D gimbal in "follow-me" mode. This has the benefit of stabalizing the yaw axis and allowing a single operator to get smooth pans by "yawing" the MR instead of the gimbal.
     
  8. Benjamin Kenobi

    Benjamin Kenobi Easy? You call that easy?

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    Posted by Benjamin Kenobi, Jun 11, 2014 #8
    Hey,

    I do things a little differently and get great results. I use the 'non-orientation lock' and control the yaw and tilt via the gimbal as I find the gimbal yaws much smoother than the MR. I also don't have retracts so just yaw the MR to keep the skids out of the way. The skids are really only a problem when the camera is pointing at 45 degrees down or more.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 6, 2014
  9. jfro

    jfro Aerial Fun

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    Posted by jfro, Jun 11, 2014 #9
    Are you using a ton of expo on your yaw channel?

    I think with setup of expo on yaw and hopefully more practice, one can get pretty smooth yaw on the MR. I many time get a nice slow start and innish on the yaw, but I can't guarantee it all the time. Still working on that part.
     
  10. Benjamin Kenobi

    Benjamin Kenobi Easy? You call that easy?

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    Posted by Benjamin Kenobi, Jun 11, 2014 #10
    Hey mate,

    No expo. I use dual rates on a proportional slider. Real slow in the beginning and end.

    I wish I could show some of the broadcast TV stuff I've been doing recently. It's nothing but pan and yaw whilst moving in complicated flight paths....one-man!
     
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